LATEST ADDITIONS

Review: Jonathan Gorse, Lab: Paul Miller  |  Apr 02, 2020
hfncommendedInspired by the Florentine Renaissance, this flagship turntable aims to combine avantgarde technological innovation with sumptuous Italian aesthetics

Think of Italy and one pictures a nation blessed with effortless style, eye-catching design and a strong sense of its own history. The Gold Note Mediterraneo boasts all these qualities, sitting atop the company's five-strong turntable range and costing £4990-£5445 (depending on finish) with the B-5.1 tonearm included. As well as the walnut plinth of our review sample, the deck is available in black lacquered MDF, white, and as a truly glorious alternative coated in an exquisitely-textured 24k gold foil. Sleek-looking and superbly crafted, when it comes to the spouse acceptance factor it's on a par with having George Clooney move in as a lodger.

Keith Howard  |  Apr 01, 2020
Keith Howard takes a look at the role capacitors play in audio circuits and explains how they influence sound

Was there a better time to be a hi-fi enthusiast than the late 1970s and early 1980s? It's hard to argue against it because there was so much going on, what with the development of digital audio on one hand and the rise of subjectivism on the other. Suddenly turntables and amplifiers were no longer judged by wow and flutter, rumble and price tag or power output, total harmonic distortion and price tag, but by listening to them. Shock, horror!

Ken Kessler  |  Mar 31, 2020  |  First Published: Mar 01, 1996
The loudspeaker firm, famed for its late-1950s amps, makes a late-1990s return to tube electronics with two new integrateds. Ken Kessler listens

When the grapevine alerted the world's tube crazies to the return of Rogers amplification, visions of two-tone faceplates danced before our eyes. A nice Cadet III [HFN May '13], or maybe an HG88 visually unchanged but suitably modernised. The collector in me rejoiced. But the Rogers beancounters felt that an all-new product was a more sensible proposition, which is why the E-20a and E-40a all-valve integrated amps have nothing whatsoever to do with the preceding models. Indeed, they have little to do with Rogers.

Johnny Black  |  Mar 27, 2020
Come 1979, punk was pretty much over. Would one of its leading lights fade with it, or could the band capitalise on their UK success and clamber to even greater heights without losing the force and the fire that made their first two albums so compelling?

The Clash were formed in 1976 after guitarist Mick Jones attended a Sex Pistols gig in the February of that year and realised that the whole UK music scene was about to change. Keith Levene, Jones's former bandmate in London SS, was drafted in on guitar, Terry Chimes played drums and the three were joined by Paul Simonon, who'd had aspirations to be a lead singer but decided to buy a bass guitar instead. Essentially he was learning on the job. Joe Strummer who had been in the pub rock band The 101ers was the new vocalist and after Levene left he also played rhythm guitar. Simonon thought up the group's name.

Review: Andrew Everard, Lab: Paul Miller  |  Mar 26, 2020
hfnoutstandingIn one swipe, the long-awaited 860A v2 replaces Simaudio's 860A, 870A and 880A power amplifiers and promises 870A performance. We pair it with the 740P preamp

There's something very 'old school' about Simaudio's latest MOON pre/power combination: both units certainly look the part in their combination of black fascias and exposed metalwork, though you can also have them in all-silver or all-black, where they have an air about them of being stripped for action. The £7800 740P preamp, for example, eschews the current trend for digital inputs and network streaming capability, and is a simple, direct, all-analogue line-only affair.

Johnny Black  |  Mar 25, 2020
This month we review: Bedouin Soundclash, Jack Broadbent, Richard Fearless and Jens Carelius.
Steve Harris  |  Mar 25, 2020
This month we review: Michel Petrucciani, Nils Landgren, Abdullah Ibrahim and Quentin Collins Sextet.
Christopher Breunig  |  Mar 25, 2020
This month we review: Korngold, Beethoven/Sibelius, Debussy/Duruflé and Tchaikovsky.
Ken Kessler  |  Mar 24, 2020
This month, we review: The Replacements, Bad Company, The Guess Who and Jethro Tull.
Ken Kessler  |  Mar 24, 2020
This month we review: The Thelonious Monk Quartet, Jackson Browne, The Runaways, and Whitesnake.

Pages

X