Christopher Breunig

Christopher Breunig  |  Mar 12, 2019  |  0 comments
Winning a conducting prize at Tanglewood kick-started his career, and at Boston he dived into recording at the deep end. Christopher Breunig gives a resume

In some recitals with other kids all playing nice-sounding pieces, I'd come crashing in with Bartók, or some American composers I was already playing – Henry Cowell, for instance.' That was Michael Tilson Thomas, looking back to his pre-teens in an interview given in the June '87 issue of HFN when he was working and recording with the London Symphony Orchestra as its principal conductor (he's now the LSO's Conductor Laureate).

Christopher Breunig  |  Mar 06, 2019  |  0 comments
This month we review: Elgar, Bartók/Enescu, Haydn/Schoenberg & Rachmaninov
Christopher Breunig  |  Dec 01, 2018  |  0 comments
This month we review: Sibelius, JS Bach, Beethoven/Brahms/Mozart and The Rotterdam PO Collection
Christopher Breunig  |  Dec 01, 2018  |  0 comments
A child prodigy from Russia whose technical aplomb was miraculous, but whose persona many perceived as icy. Christopher Breunig names his favourite recordings

For the violinist Itzhak Perlman, and others of his generation, the subject of this month's Classical Companion was a deity – 'I can't believe it. I'm talking to God – to Heifetz' he said of first meeting him when he was 14. But as Jascha Heifetz died in 1987, perhaps he's just a name on a CD cover to today's aspiring young violinists.

Christopher Breunig  |  Nov 01, 2018  |  0 comments
This month we review: Schubert, Bruch, Ravel/Gershwin, and Mozart.
Christopher Breunig  |  Nov 01, 2018  |  0 comments
Perhaps the last great Russian Romantic symphony, it was premiered by the composer himself in 1908. Christopher Breunig has been listening to some modern recordings

'A six and a half foot scowl' was how Stravinsky defined his fellow compatriot composer (they both left Russia for the States). But there's plenty of historic film which shows this aperçu was wide of the mark. You can see him on the boat crossing the Atlantic, relaxing with family and friends in America, and standing with one of the big cars he enjoyed there [to the accompaniment of the slow movt of Symphony No 2 in the 1959 RCA/Sony Ormandy recording]. But we have no performance material, alas, either as pianist or conductor.

Christopher Breunig  |  Oct 01, 2018  |  0 comments
This month we review: Haydn, Dream Album, Mendelssohn/Fanny Mendelssohn, and R Strauss.
Christopher Breunig  |  Sep 01, 2018  |  0 comments
This month we review: Bruckner/Wagner, Handel, Mahler, and Scarlatti
Christopher Breunig  |  Dec 10, 2010  |  0 comments
A Festival Hall recording originally made by Tony Faulkner in Feb 1989, for what is now called Music Preserved, this was one of Klaus Tennstedt’s characteristic concert performances. And it is gratifying to see the transfer honouring Mahler’s wish for a break after (i), here spanning a considerable 25m. His highly individual response to the ‘Resurrection’ (some will say related to his awareness of mortality) is apparent from the beginning, and never diminishes, although the very deliberate second movt will not suit all tastes. The ‘Urlicht’ is beautifully sung and Yvonne Kenny’s later contribution no less considerable.
Christopher Breunig  |  Dec 10, 2010  |  0 comments
Rebranding himself simply as Yundi, the Chinese pianist moves to EMI with the promise of a complete Chopin series. Produced by his former DG team (Christopher Alder/Klaus Hiemann), these Nocturne recordings were completed in a Zurich church during January. The sound is resonant but clean, wide in dynamic range – and preferable to that in last month’s Freire/Decca set. The two pianists are most divergent in the Lisztian Op.

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