C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)

C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Aug 01, 2016  |  0 comments
44. 1kHz-192kHz/24-bit FLAC/ALAC, CKD471 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) A fellow-pupil with Beethoven in Bonn, Antoine Reicha (from Prague) wrote no fewer than 24 wind quintets, represented here by an Adagio for cor anglais and wind quartet and Quintets in G and B-flat.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Aug 01, 2016  |  0 comments
This young Italian pianist was silver prizewinner at the 2013 Van Cliburn Competition and makes her Warner concerto debut with Pappano. They had not worked together before but in May are touring with the Tchaikovsky – which Rana had been playing for almost ten years. And 3-4m in she certainly hits her stride: arguably her first-movement cadenza is over-complicated but mostly this is as good as its gets – robust technique, a wide dynamic range and real bravura at the ends of (ii) and (iii). Pappano provides a big, even brash, accompaniment and the piano is well balanced in the big hall acoustic.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Jul 01, 2016  |  0 comments
44. 1kHz to 192kHz/24-bit FLAC/ALAC, CKD456 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) Only two Mozart pieces for bassoon remain: the concerto and this three-movement sonata from 1775, published later in Leipzig as for bassoon/cello – here, the cello is replaced by an unspecified fortepiano.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Jul 01, 2016  |  0 comments
With a Bartók cycle to come, the Lyon-based string quartet has already recorded all of Shostakovich’s string quartets for Arion. The music here – the ‘Élégie’ Adagio a transcription from Lady Macbeth Of Mtsensk – is their programme ‘Opus’ (ordered as listed above) an ‘acrobatic waltz’ [sic] which they have been giving with Australian performance group C!RCA; the Internet has video clips. They play with compelling concentration, certainly bringing out all of the rawness of the epic No 8, with its ‘DSCH’ quotations. And you might need to turn the level down, as they are recorded rather as the Juilliards were by CBS, each player seemingly with his own mic.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Jun 01, 2016  |  0 comments
As the British musicologist Michael Talbot explains in a lengthy note, Corelli was as influential a figure in organising performances in 17th century Rome as he was a composer. His appointed successor was Antonio Montanari, little of whose music has survived – five of the concertos here receive premiere recordings. The Paris-based Ensemble Diderot uses period or modern copy instruments, and, as a Toblach concert hall session photograph indicates, the players stand (where practicable) to play – the now fashionable method for Baroque performers. The concertos offer an adventurous, unconventional ride, ranging from the staccato Adagio of Op.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Jun 01, 2016  |  0 comments
Kopatchinskaja is a ‘Marmite’ violinist, as anyone who has loved/suffered her Bartók and Prokofiev recordings will attest. And when you read the booklet at HRA and see its (in part informative) notes are couched in the form of artful love letters between soloist and conductor you might fear the worst from this 2014/13 Moscow/Madrid theatres coupling. All the singers in Les Noces are native and MusicAeterna uses period instruments. The authenticity tells in their marvellously sung, energetic Les Noces, and unusual timbres add to the concerto performance.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  May 03, 2016  |  0 comments
The young Paris Conservatoire trained cellist’s 2014 debut CD Play was of salon pieces. A year on – Moreau almost 21 – he tackles 18th-century concertos with a period orchestra [see also HFN Album Choice Mar ’15]. The punning title means ‘young lad’. With the finale taken at a real lick, the Haydn C major is the one well-known work here.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  May 03, 2016  |  0 comments
Perhaps reissued to mark Arvo Pärt’s recent 80th birthday, this was a ground-breaking album release on LP in 1984 and some of the music was soon taken up by other artists: fellow Estonian Neeme Järvi with Cantus, Tasmin Litle with Fratres. ECM’s programme has 12 Berlin Philharmonic cellists playing it and the violin/piano version with Gidon Kremer and Keith Jarrett. Tabula Rasa is for two solo violins, prepared piano (Schnittke playing, no less) and small orchestra. Cantus, a threnody with strings and final tolling bell, written in memory of Britten, especially had a cult following (though it doesn’t inspire me!).
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Apr 13, 2016  |  0 comments
The Milanese Giovanni Antonini, like Frans Brüggen, came to conducting via the baroque recorder; he was also co-founder of Il Giardino Armonico. So it’s not surprising to find his Beethoven the very antithesis of Karajan’s: a dry attack with sharp dynamic differentiation. (Wonderful how the concerto steals in from nowhere!) Recorded in the modern Luxembourg Philharmonie, the players patently give their all for him. The two ‘serious’ overtures are the most satisfying tracks here, but that’s only because Sony has frequently given the soloists too much prominence in the Triple Concerto – Gabetta being one of its ‘star’ signings.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Mar 11, 2016  |  0 comments
96kHz/24-bit & 16-bit, FLAC, Harmonia Mundi HMC 902181. 82 (supplied by www. eclassical. com) For these 2013 Freiburg Ensemblehaus recordings of the seven keyboard concertos with strings – BWV1057 more familiar as the Fourth Brandenburg, BWV1054 and 1058 derived from violin concertos – Staier has chosen a modern copy of a 1734 Hass instrument.

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