C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)

C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Jan 01, 2017  |  0 comments
The works in the Georgian pianist’s new programme – Mussorgsky’s Pictures At An Exhibition, Ravel’s La Valse and the three scenes from Petrushka which Stravinsky transcribed for Rubinstein – make huge technical demands. But Buniatishvili says she chose them more for their artistic associations: painting, dance and puppetry. Using a huge range of keyboard colours every possible wisp of characterisation is seized upon and personalised: these are polar opposites to the ‘straight’ Paul Lewis Pictures or Pollini Petrushka, and I found them utterly seductive. Each ‘Promenade’ in the Mussorgsky is treated differently, while the brilliant ‘Limoges Market’ or the hatching chicks are fresh and vibrant.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Jan 01, 2017  |  0 comments
As the promo video suggests, with two mics right under his nose it’s unsurprising that Pinchas Zukerman’s Lark Ascending remake at Cadogan Hall quite lacks the necessary sense of distance. (He was introduced to the work by Daniel Barenboim in 1973. ) However, Elgar himself must take the blame for acceding to recycling the sublime viola passage from In The South as ‘In Moonlight’ (here set for viola/orchestra)… Of the other three longer works, the Tallis Fantasia is really impressive, but Elgar’s Serenade For Strings and Introduction & Allegro prove somewhat ‘in yer face’ and a strain for the listener. Zukerman also directs the Chanson De Matin/Chanson De Nuit duo and Salut D’Amour and these light pieces come off well enough.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Dec 01, 2016  |  0 comments
Reviewed as an SACD in HFN Jul ’16, these are string orchestra transcriptions recorded at The Barbican (as DSD128 – might we hear this in the future?) on 26th April 2015. The Schubert Quartet was partly adapted by Mahler, and completed here by Donald Mitchell and David Matthews, while Shostakovich’s powerful Eighth was expanded, with the composer’s approval, by Rudol Barshai in 1974. It contains quotations from earlier works, from Tchaikovsky and the ‘DSCH’ motif. Such is the sensitivity of the 24 LSO string players that much of the intimacy of the Schubert prevails, and while I prefer the Shostakovich in its original form (we reviewed it herewith the Quatuor Debussy) the performance here has an admirably stark impact and presence in this dry acoustic setting.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Dec 01, 2016  |  0 comments
192kHz/24-bit, FLAC/ALAC; CKD512 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) Three string orchestra transcriptions of Debussy (the Quartet arranged by the SE’s leader Jonathan Morton, the ‘Girl With The Flaxen Hair’ by Colin Matthews, and ‘Jimbo’s Lullaby’ from the Children’s Corner Suite by bassist James Manson – he plays on the recording too) alternate with film-associated music tracks by Takemitsu. His funeral march from Black Rain (emphatically not the Michael Douglas film) is followed by music for a boxer documentary, then Nostalghia, a homage to Tarkovsky.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Nov 01, 2016  |  0 comments
The most familiar of the complete Haydn symphony cycles is the late-’60s/early-’70s Philharmonia Hungarica/Doráti set on Decca. Now the company has released a 36CD period-instrument equivalent using existing Hogwood and Brüggen recordings plus these new versions of this little-known group of symphonies composed in 1782-84. They became, the booklet note says, sufficiently popular in Europe to prompt a commission for the ‘Paris’ series. And that’s not surprising: I found myself encoring the finales of both Nos 79 and 81, and was mightily intrigued by the construction of No 80(i) where a simple dance tune keeps popping up in the context of a feverish allegro.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Nov 01, 2016  |  0 comments
96kHz & 192kHz/24-bit FLAC, CKD516 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) If you have seen Amadeus on stage or film, you’ll recall the words the late Peter Shaffer ascribed to Salieri on the ‘miracle’ of the Adagio from Mozart’s great Serenade for 13 wind instruments (no double-bass with Pinnock’s performance). It is coupled here with a Haydn Notturno in his revised scoring, its scampering finale in ‘hunting’ idiom.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Oct 01, 2016  |  0 comments
96kHz to 192kHz/24-bit FLAC, CKD526 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) Renowned baroque violinist and period-instrument ensemble director Monica Huggett is artistic director of the Irish Baroque Orchestra, and they have recorded Bach programmes together for Avie and the RTÉ Lyric label. Here – harking back to a time when concerto soloists were members of the orchestra, rather than ‘star’ performers – she has chosen seven by no means familiar works by 17th-century composers (Fasch, Graupner, Heinichen, Telemann and Vivaldi) written for one or up to six solo players.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Oct 01, 2016  |  0 comments
96kHz to 192kHz/24-bit FLAC, CKD478 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) These Britten recordings were made at Snape Maltings between Oct ’12 and Apr ’15 – no mention of the Tallis Fantasia in the excellent PDF notes or on the cover but you do get the texts of the great Serenade. Young Apollo had been suppressed by Britten and was first recorded by Simon Rattle in 1982.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Sep 01, 2016  |  0 comments
Written for Joachim in 1853 (as was the more coherent Phantasy in C), Schumann’s Violin Concerto was suppressed until 1937 – with perhaps some justification. Zehetmair found many errors in the printed edition when preparing for his 1988 Teldec CD, and this is his second recording. Choosing a chamber orchestra for Schumann is now the norm but such is the reverberance of the venue, the Théâtre des Champs-Elyseés, it could be of any size. And I didn’t like effectively a separate acoustic for the solo violin.
C. Breunig (Music); P. Miller (Lab)  |  Sep 01, 2016  |  0 comments
96kHz to 192kHz/24-bit FLAC, CKD 570 (supplied by www. linnrecords. com) Marking his 70th birthday, this recital reflects both the journeys made by early composers from one country to another and those made by Trevor Pinnock in company with his preferred, rich-toned, 1982 American harpsichord modelled after an 18th-century Hemsch instrument, which he’s been playing for 40 years. We haven’t previously featured a solo harpsichord in this HFN section – recorded at the concert hall at Kent University, Canterbury, by Philip Hobbs in Aug ’14, this programme has pieces by JS Bach (The Sixth French Suite), Bull (his pictorial, galloping The King’s Hunt), Byrd, Cabezon, Frescobaldi, Handel (a floridly decorated Chaconne in G), Sweelinck and Tallis, and ends with three Scarlatti sonatas.

Pages

X